1. Editorial Comment

Angela J. Fawcett, Editor-in-Chief

 

 

It is a very great pleasure to publish the 13th issue of the Asia Pacific Journal of Developmental Differences, now in its seventh year of publication, which is published by the Dyslexia Association of Singapore. The response to the previous issues continue to be extremely gratifying, and we intend to maintain these high standards in this issue and forthcoming issues. We have now amassed an even stronger editorial board, and I am grateful for the support of the academics and professionals involved in resolving any issues arising. In this issue, we present seven articles representing international research on a number of important issues addressing theory and practice. In this issue, we cover the full range, from early education through to university, and highlight a range of approaches that have proved useful with children or adults with developmental differences. In the first article from Lee Er Ker and colleagues, Speech-Language Therapists at the Dyslexia Association of Singapore, the authors set out to investigate the impact of their therapy on the progress of children with language difficulties on subtests of the CELF®– 4UK, a key measure of language in common use in speech therapy. This was evaluated in a controlled study with the intervention group making significantly greater progress over the course of the intervention than the control group. This is an interesting study in an area which is rarely tackled in the literature because it is difficult to construct an appropriate study for children who can suffer from a range of differences in their language. In the following two articles, a range of approaches are considered with children who suffer from visual deficits in their processing, that have been associated with dyslexia. In the first study presented by Isobelle Wong she undertakes an analysis of the level of visual deficits in a group of 30 children receiving support from the Dyslexia Association of Singapore. This study introduces a number of technical terms associated with a visual deficit which are important for the following study as well. The results of this study identified a greater proportion of visual deficits in dyslexic children than in the general population, with some children showing evidence of quite severe deficits that would be predicted to impact on their progress in reading. Recommendations are made that future studies should routinely consider these aspects of processing....

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1. Editorial Comment
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