2. Orthographic Advantage Theory: National advantage and disadvantage due to orthographic differences

Bruce Allen Knight1*,Susan A. Galletly1, Pamela S Gargett2

  1. Central Queensland University
  2. Queensland Department of Education, Training & Employment

 

Abstract

Considerable research reports nations differ in orthographic complexity (regularity and consistency of spelling patterns used); that this impacts ease and speed of reading and writing development; and that, in contrast to the world’s many regular-orthography nations, English word-reading and word-writing development is extremely slow, with difficulties more frequent and severe (Knight, Galletly & Gargett, 2017; Seymour, Aro, & Erskine, 2003; Share, 2008). Orthographic Advantage Theory proposes that, according to their level of orthographic complexity, nations experience disadvantage and potential advantage in multiple areas of education and national functioning. Building from current cross-linguistic theories and research on cross-linguistic differences, it proposes six dimensions of orthographic advantage and disadvantage, namely: ease of early literacy development; simplified school instruction and learning across primary and secondary school; ease of improving education; impacts of reduced workplace illiteracy; increased adult life advantage; and generational advantage through confidently literate parents being able to effectively support their children’s literacy development. This article details Orthographic Advantage Theory, building from review of research findings that show the major differences in reading development and outcomes in regular-orthography and Anglophone nations. The theory is offered as a tool for educators and researchers towards optimising reading and literacy outcomes.

.

Keywords:          Orthographic Advantage Theory, reading development, writing development

Publication not found.

2. Orthographic Advantage Theory: National advantage and disadvantage due to orthographic differences
1 / 0